Valuing Our Work by Lucy Felthouse (@cw1985)

This article originally appeared at The Erotica Readers & Writers Association blog.

I had a conversation with someone recently that went something like this:

Woman: Oh, you’ll have to lend me one of your books to read.

Me: I thought you were buying one? (I’d previously given her a business card with a link to my website, etc)

Woman: Oh, I was. But then I thought I didn’t want to spend any money on it, in case I didn’t like it.

Me: (in a jovial tone of voice) That’s my livelihood you’re taking away.

Woman: I’m not! I just wanted to lend one, then I’d give it back.

Me: What, with sticky pages?

This then, fortunately, diverted the attention away from the conversation and made everyone giggle, and it wasn’t brought up again. But it made me think: what value is put on books? And I mean in all genres, not erotica specifically.

From what I can see, not much. Why do people balk at spending a couple of quid/dollars on an eBook (paperbacks, of course, are a different kettle of fish as they’re usually more expensive) which will hopefully give them hours of reading pleasure (and maybe other kinds of pleasure, too!), and possibly then be read again sometime in the future? Yet they’ll think nothing of spending more on a cup of coffee, which will be gone within half an hour, and not have any lasting impact on their life. The cup of coffee would have been made very cheaply, quickly and easily. Sure, it probably tastes good, but that’s it.

A book wouldn’t have been written cheaply, quickly or easily. Writing isn’t any of those things. Yes, some people can write much faster than others, but that still doesn’t make it an easy task. It’s hard work. Enjoyable, yes, but still hard work, and, most importantly, a valid job/occupation.

I wonder if this is what it comes down to: people thinking writing isn’t a proper job. Because, for the most part, we can set our own hours and have some freedom, it means it’s not real. Therefore, if it’s not a proper job, then we shouldn’t expect to be paid properly.

Naturally, people “in the know” realise this is a load of rubbish. Although I don’t write full-time, I’m gradually building up my volume of writing to boost my overall income. I don’t rely on it, because I can’t. Not by a long stretch. Therefore, it’s important that my work (and every other writer’s) is valued. Even if it’s not a full-time job, it is still a job. Just because we enjoy it, love what we do, doesn’t mean we should do it for free, or a pittance. Folk mistakenly believe that all published authors earn a fortune and therefore, what’s one freebie here or there?

Sorry, not happening. I already run quite a few giveaways on my site, in my newsletter, as part of blog hops, and so on. And they are for people actually interested in reading my work. I hope that they will read one of my books, like it, and buy another. Maybe recommend it to their friends. If they don’t like it, fair enough. Reading is subjective and, as much as I’d like to, I know I can’t please everyone. But at least there’s a chance of gaining another valuable reader. In the case of the woman above, I’m not sure I would have, regardless of whether or not she enjoyed my book. After all, if she’s not willing to spend money, take a chance on a book/writer, then she clearly doesn’t value writing.

I would love to hear your comments on this. Am I crazy? Over-sensitive? What? Should I just lend her a book?

Happy Reading,
Lucy

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Author Bio:

Lucy Felthouse is a very busy woman! She writes erotica and erotic romance in a variety of subgenres and pairings, and has over 100 publications to her name, with many more in the pipeline. These include several editions of Best Bondage Erotica, Best Women’s Erotica 2013 and Best Erotic Romance 2014. Another string to her bow is editing, and she has edited and co-edited a number of anthologies, and also edits for a small publishing house. She owns Erotica For All, is book editor forCliterati, and is one eighth of The Brit Babes. Find out more athttp://www.lucyfelthouse.co.uk. Join her on Facebook and Twitter, and subscribe to her newsletter at: http://eepurl.com/gMQb9

2 Responses to Valuing Our Work by Lucy Felthouse (@cw1985)

  1. Interesting question, Lucy. I always use the cup of coffee analogy when I’m frustrated at the lack of value placed on writing. There are so many hours of work in every book, whether short, long, eBook, print and so on, and yet you can make a cuppa in a couple of minutes, and drink it in 3-4 mouthfuls. I always say I have two jobs – my day job in which I spend about 28 hours a week, and my writing job, in which I spend about 25-30 hours a week. My day job supports me. My writing job is a work-in-progress in regards to income – and anything that devalues my effort in either area is disappointing. I don’t think you were being over-sensitive at all!

    • Yes, completely agreed. My day job is what pays the bills. My writing income is getting better, which is great, but I certainly can’t rely on it!