Tag Archives: reading

Entertainment for Entertainment’s Sake by Lucy Felthouse (@cw1985)

Hi everyone,

Today I’d like to talk about entertainment for entertainment’s sake, or TV show/film/book shaming.

Lately I’ve noticed a bit of a trend online, whereby people “shame” others for watching certain TV shows or films, or reading certain books. I felt it was a topic worth discussing… so here I am.

Personally, I watch all kinds of TV shows and films, and read all kinds of books. As long as I’m entertained, it doesn’t really matter to me what the genre is (though obviously there are some genres I don’t enjoy at all), or the tone, etc. Sometimes I’m in the mood for something dark and totally gripping, sometimes I’m in the mood for something dramatic, and sometimes I’m in the mood for something light, funny, something I don’t have to think about too much, or all of those things. That’s my preference, my personal opinion.

So why, then, do people feel the need to shame others for watching/reading certain things? I joined in with a discussion about a certain TV show a while back, and while on the one hand people were commenting saying how much they enjoyed the show, too, some others jumped in and started picking it apart, saying the show was inaccurate (I hadn’t noticed), lacked substance, and so on. I didn’t argue, because that’s not my bag, but it did irritate me. It felt as though myself and the others who’d stated they enjoyed the show were being shamed for liking a show that “lacked substance.” Granted, it is what I’d call a light and fluffy show, and doesn’t require you to think about it an awful lot. But for me, that’s the charm. Sometimes all I want to do is plonk myself down in front of TV and be entertained, and smile, and laugh, and be charmed by something. For me, that show ticked those boxes.

So why is that wrong? Are we only “allowed” to enjoy deeply cerebral TV shows, films and books? Or are we only “allowed” to admit to those things which educate us or make us think? Do we have to keep our enjoyment of entertainment for entertainment’s sake under wraps? Why should we?

Don’t get me wrong, I’m not saying that inaccuracy is okay – research can easily prevent that, but mistakes happen. The editor in me picks up on them frequently – in fact I watched a show recently (one of the dark, totally gripping ones, actually!) which completely hooked me. I thought it was fantastic, but I did notice some continuity errors. They bugged me a bit, but not enough for me to stop watching the show, or even comment on it anywhere – life’s too short. But when I Googled afterwards, I saw articles dedicated to pointing out those issues and slating the entire show!

So, let’s discuss. Where do you stand on this debate? I’d love to hear your thoughts.

Happy Reading (or watching),

Lucy xx

*****

Author Bio:

Lucy Felthouse is the award-winning author of erotic romance novels Stately Pleasures (named in the top 5 of Cliterati.co.uk’s 100 Modern Erotic Classics That You’ve Never Heard Of, and an Amazon bestseller), Eyes Wide Open (winner of the Love Romances Café’s Best Ménage Book 2015 award, and an Amazon bestseller), The Persecution of the Wolves and Hiding in Plain Sight. Including novels, short stories and novellas, she has over 160 publications to her name. She owns Erotica For All, and is one eighth of The Brit Babes. Find out more about her writing at http://lucyfelthouse.co.uk, or on Twitter or Facebook. Sign up for automatic updates on Amazon or BookBub. Subscribe to her newsletter and get a free eBook: http://www.subscribepage.com/lfnewsletter

Getting Caught with a #Book ~ with @MeganSlayer (And a New Release!)

I’ve always loved to read. As far back as I can remember, I’ve loved books. If I could have been reading all the time, I would’ve been. But, I had to go to school and learn things, too.

That said, I did get into trouble once and it was big trouble. Sounds silly looking back on the moment, but at the time, it was…er…murder.

I was in the sixth grade (Maybe it was the 7th, I’m not totally sure now), but I was in English class and supposed to be diagramming sentences. Right. It wasn’t a difficult task. But, I didn’t want to. You see…I’d picked up a copy of Murder on the Orient Express by Agatha Christie. I blew through the book. Like, didn’t pay attention in science class or math, I was so engrossed. I had to know what would happen next. I hid the book under the desk and read instead of doing whatever it was we were learning. Hey, the book practically cried out for me to read it. Unfortunately, my English teacher didn’t share my vigor. Nope. She caught me. Three times. Each time after being redirected, so to speak, I’d go right back to my book. Now you’d think reading a book wouldn’t be so horrible. I was reading! But I was supposed to be working on diagramming sentences so I’d know what a hanging gerund was (I’m still not entirely sure, but that’s not important right now). Yeah, so the fourth time was the last straw for the teacher. I still wasn’t done with the book, but she wasn’t having any of this. She took the book away. Yep. Poof! Gone. No book. Sad Megan. So not fun. I had to actually diagram those sentences and was in trouble. She pulled me aside after class and reminded me I was in school to learn… not read. GASP! I know. She called my mother and reminded her that I wasn’t paying attention. Oh, boy, did I get into trouble when I got home.

All because of a book. To this day, I love Murder on the Orient Express and will take time here and there to read it. It’s my form of fighting the machine, I guess. Hey, you have to take time to read. 🙂

Speaking of reading, want to read a little bit about my latest release, Making the Play? You sure do! Here you go!

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Making the Play 

Megan Slayer

Out of Bounds Series

M/M, Anal Sex, Masturbation

Novella

Sports Romance

Pride Publishing

 

Sometimes switching things up really does mean getting the guy.

Allan Clark thought his life as a wide receiver for the Wildcats was over the moment he was told he’d be the new punt returner. He’d thought he didn’t want to be a special teams player. He’d rather have the limelight. But once he starts returning punts, he realizes this was where he should’ve been all along. Speaking of perks, he now gets to spend time with the sexy kicker, Tyler Leigh. Maybe this switch is the best thing that could’ve happened to him.

Unlike Allan, Tyler isn’t planning on going into the draft or playing football for the rest of his life. He’s got other plans, though a side trip in the sheets with Allan isn’t off his radar. He’s wanted Allan since he joined the team. But Tyler’s got baggage and an overzealous ex-boyfriend hell-bent on making his life miserable. With Allan, he sees a bright spot.

Will these two seeming opposites leave their desires on the field, or will they find common ground together and score?

Reader Advisory: This book contains scenes of masturbation, implied abuse as well as references to violence, physical assault and emotional abuse.

Available from Pride Publishing:

https://www.pride-publishing.com/book/making-the-play

And soon from ebook retailers everywhere.

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Megan Slayer – It’s Always Fun to Squirm ~ Find me at: http://wendizwaduk.com/indexMegan.htm 
Subscribe to our newsletter ~ http://ymlp.com/xgjmjumygmgj 

It’s Crazy Out There…

heap of booksThe world of publishing is a crazy and often scary place. I’ve been in it a few years so I’m used to it now, but I remember back in the beginning I didn’t have a clue what I was doing. So here are a few bits and pieces I wish I’d known back then…

1. Don’t sign a contract without reading it. Not all publishers are legit.

I’m not naming any names here, not at all, but I remember how exciting it was to be offered a contract to publish my work. I thought it was the best thing ever and didn’t stop to think what would happen if something went wrong with the publisher further down the line. So look at the length of your contract (between three and five years is about average), what rights the publisher is asking for, and so on. If you’re not sure about a particular contract, ask other authors that write for the publisher in question for their opinion. Most of us are pretty helpful.

2. Learn to edit yourself.

The work you submit to a publisher should be your absolute best. Yes, you’ll be assigned an editor, but that doesn’t mean you should send in a piece riddled with spelling errors, and wrong punctuation and grammar. Nobody’s perfect, but you want to stay on your editor’s good side, as well as being professional, so edit your own work before sending it in. I find reading out loud helps.

3. Read lots in your chosen genre.

That way, you’ll get an idea of what’s being published, what sort of quality, what plots, what publishers are publishing what genres and pairings, and so on. You shouldn’t try to emulate anyone’s writing, you should always develop your own style, but it will help you learn about the more technical side of writing.

I hope this helps any budding writers out there. And other authors, please feel free to chip in with any other pieces of advice.

*****

Lucy Felthouse is a very busy woman! She writes erotica and erotic romance in a variety of subgenres and pairings, and has over seventy publications to her name, with many more in the pipeline. These include Best Bondage Erotica 2012 and 2013, and Best Women’s Erotica 2013. Another string to her bow is editing, and she has edited and co-edited a number of anthologies. She owns Erotica For All, and is book editor for Cliterati. Find out more at http://www.lucyfelthouse.co.uk. Join her on Facebook and Twitter, and subscribe to her newsletter at: http://eepurl.com/gMQb9